Tag Archives: chinese history

3 reasons why coworking is booming in China and what’s next?

3 reasons why coworking is booming in China and what’s next?

According to real estate services firm Jones Lang Lasalle, by the end of 2016 there were over 500 coworking sites in Shanghai and Beijing alone, compared to just a few in the end of 2015. As the sharing economy takes root in China with increasing vigour, a growing number of Chinese customers are shifting to a collaborative consumption lifestyle, resulting in a huge boom of co-working spaces in recent years with thousands of operators emerging. Generally speaking this is a mindset change: from owning something to renting something. Since this ‘new’ mindset is not totally a new thing in China, coming from a collectivist...
What’s up with China’s over-style

What’s up with China’s over-style

Maximalism If you ever set foot in a hotel, bar, KTV or restaurant of a tier two Chinese city, you are probably familiar with the extravaganza of the interiors. If you ever walked down the streets of Xidan, Beijing youngsters’ shopping district, you’ve already jumped into some serious fashion-tackiness. If you’ve ever scrolled down the dark alleys of any of the popular Chinese live broadcasting apps I’m sure you noticed that over-styling has been taken by many way beyond the limitations of fashion. Over the past five to six years many Chinese women asked their plastic surgeons to make them “look...
Less instant noodles and more local food: the second wave of Chinese outbound travel

Less instant noodles and more local food: the second wave of Chinese outbound travel

In late 2014 president Xi Jinping, while visiting the Maldives, advised Chinese travelers to eat less instant noodles and more local food when in other countries. Despite the economy slowing, the impact on outbound travel from high-net-worth individuals seems to have steadily grown. The length of travel is also increasing for some, and more Chinese travelers are even taking an entire “gap year” abroad. Historically speaking, the Chinese have never really been interested in exploring the world before. But according to a recent report of Business Intelligence Fung Center, the number of Chinese tourist travelling abroad is constantly growing and could...
Why a flexible approach is crucial to waterfront design in China

Why a flexible approach is crucial to waterfront design in China

  According to a research done by National Geographic, If All The Ice Melted, There are more than five million cubic miles of ice on Earth, and some scientists say it would take more than 5,000 years to melt it all. If we continue adding carbon to the atmosphere, we’ll very likely create an ice-free planet, with an average temperature of perhaps 80 degrees Fahrenheit instead of the current 58 raising the sea level 216 feet and creating new shorelines for our continents and inland seas. Rising ocean water would flood China’s most economically developed region of more than one...
Has China been an architects’ test field for too long?

Has China been an architects’ test field for too long?

As the New York Times and Xinhua report, president  Xi Jinping has shared some opinions about on the desirable path that Chinese “art” scene should follow at a symposium in Beijing. Some of these tips were more obvious, like that artists should not be “slaves” of the market or “lose themselves in the tide of market economy nor go astray while answering the question of whom to serve” (Andy Warhol would disagree on this one). Or that Chinese artists should “disseminate contemporary Chinese values, embody traditional Chinese culture and reflect Chinese people’s aesthetic pursuit” and avoid “plagiarism, mechanization and fast-food style...
Chinese architects rediscovering the tradition of bamboo

Chinese architects rediscovering the tradition of bamboo

Bamboo is an extremely fast-growing species of giant grass that grows abundantly, quickly and cheaply across East Asia, Northern Australia and west to India and the Himalayas, but also occur in the Americas and the sub-Saharan Africa. It’s high strength-to-weight ratio, comparable to the ratio of steel, makes it adapt for construction uses. While in Japan, bamboo was used primarily as a supplemental or decorative element, throughout China’s building tradition, bamboo was a dominant material in architecture, especially in southern China. It was used for all the elements in architecture: structure, wall, floor, furniture, or ladders and stairs. A bamboo...